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Since the introduction of Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) mortality has fallen dramatically in African countries affected by HIV. However, almost all the evidence about HIV-related mortality before, during and after ART roll-out is based on models, or on data collected in care and treatment clinics, which cannot account for deaths prior to diagnosis or enrolment in care. This session will use the unique observational data source provided by ten community-based studies in the ALPHA network, spread across six countries of Eastern and Southern Africa, to provide direct information on age- and sex-specific mortality trends in HIV infected and uninfected adults, to describe the distribution of deaths on the treatment cascade, and how ART is changing causes of death amongst infected individuals. These findings will be related to policy environments in each country, to service provision in clinics serving the different study sites, and to narratives of persons navigating the care cascade.

17:00
MOSA4501
Chair's introduction: How much do we really know about HIV mortality in Africa?
Michelle Morrisson, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, United States
17:10
MOSA4502
Co-chair's introduction: the ALPHA network: What makes ALPHA data on HIV mortality unique?
Basia Zaba, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, United Kingdom
Slides
17:20
MOSA4503
The good news – expansion of policies and services and the rapidly shrinking burden of HIV mortality
Malebogo Tlhajoane, Imperial College London, United Kingdom
Georges Reniers, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, United Kingdom
17:40
MOSA4504
The bad news – residual mortality on the HIV care continuum and insights on the experiences of people who died of HIV
Emma Slaymaker, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, United Kingdom
Mosa Moshabela, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
Slides
18:00
MOSA4505
The ugly news – widening gender disparities in ART access and benefits: warnings for test and treat programs?
Chodziwadziwa Kabudula, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, United Kingdom
Joyce Wamoyi, National Institute for Medical Research, United Republic of Tanzania
Slides
18:20
MOSA4506
Breaking news – opportunities and challenges going beyond the study populations, linking research and routine service data
Samuel Clark, Ohio State University, United States
James Todd, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, United Republic of Tanzania
Slides
18:40
MOSA4507
A critical evaluation of the evidence presented from the UNAIDS perspective
Mary Mahy, Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), Switzerland
Slides